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You don’t know American fashion if you don’t know the CFDA.

Founded in 1962, the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) remains a vital pillar of the American fashion industry. The New York City-based trade association boasts over 450 members across different segments of the fashion industry, including Tom Ford, its current chairman, and current committee members like Michael Kors, Tommy Hilfiger, Virgil Abloh, and Kerby Jean-Raymond. The CFDA organizes New York Fashion Week and hosts the annual CFDA awards, among other things. Membership is open to U.S. designers or designers based in the U.S. on an invite-only basis…


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When Netflix and Shondaland’s “Bridgerton” premiered Christmas Day 2020, it was an instant hit. Multiple articles have praised the show as a revolutionary take on the period drama genre due to its inclusion of diverse skin tones in a milieu that has traditionally (and historically) centered whiteness. (Not to mention the explicit sex scenes…) The show is everywhere. It’s reignited a debate over whether Queen Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz was black. A growing number of YouTube videos are dissecting the show’s fashion accuracy. A spoon featured in the show received its own Instagram account. …


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Amid the final days of terrible 2020, there was a row on Twitter about the value of well-known American fashion brand Michael Kors.

“Someone posted a MK purse for Christmas talking about shes spoiled,” Twitter user @Lanazattitude posted Christmas Day. “1st of all MK been played out and thats not being spoiled.”

The lone tweet received around 1,000 replies and over 9,000 quote tweets, sparking a Black Twitter debate about luxury fashion and elitism. …


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On December 22, sister-pop duo and early 2000s Disney darlings Aly & AJ announced a re-release of their 2007 single “Potential Breakup Song,” a track that has managed to live on in the hearts of the now-adults who used to wait for it to play on Disney channel or Radio Disney.

2020 was the year of nostalgia. Trapped within apartments or parent’s homes due to the pandemic, many had no choice but to be regaled by old television shows like “Moesha” and “Gossip Girl,” or look for news on reboots of titles such as the disappointing “Winx Club” or…


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Illustration by ArtJane of Pixabay.com.

I last left the house bare-faced in mid-March, when my friends and I took a spontaneous trip to the Williamsburg outlets. We traveled 30 minutes together in a sedan, shared ice cream, and burned our mouths with hot sauce samples, the threat of COVID-19 no more potent than the common flu in our minds. An hour into our excursion, Harvard University announced that students would not return for the remainder of the semester after Spring Break. In the coming days, one-by-one, my friends and I waited to receive emails about extended Spring Breaks, and later, full-on shifts to online classes.


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Photo courtesy of Gage Skidmore. Edited by Jiana Nicole.

Kamala Harris made history on November 7 as the first Black and Asian-American woman to become Vice President-elect of the United States. Donning a crisp white Caroline Herrera pantsuit for her victory speech that evening at the Chase Center in Wilmington, Delaware, Harris took the time to thank voters, campaign staff and volunteers. …


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Beyoncé’s September 2018 Vogue cover was an incredible moment in fashion. Editor-in-chief Anna Wintour gave Beyoncé full creative control, which the singer leveraged to hire Tyler Mitchell, the first black photographer to shoot a Vogue cover.

This moment was particularly important to former Vogue creative director and editor-at-large André Leon Talley. To him, the Beyoncé shoot was full of symbolism, inspired by the “unnamed armies” of hardworking black women in the South.

Talley’s piece about the cover was published in The Washington Post. Though it was sent to various editors at Condé Nast, none of them, including Wintour, responded.

“Editors…


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George Floyd was murdered May 25 in Minneapolis. His murderers were Tou Thao, who jeered at concerned bystanders; Thomas Lane and J. Alexander Keung, who helped restrain him, though he was already in handcuffs; and Derek Chauvin, who knelt on Floyd’s neck for eight minutes and 46 seconds, despite Floyd’s pleas for breath.

Since then, unprecedented protests have emerged in all 50 states and even places as far as the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Japan. Protestors of all races, religions and ages are experiencing police brutality firsthand, being exposed to teargas and losing eyes to rubber bullets. Online…


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Alternative singer-songwriter Lana Del Rey, the artist behind albums “Born to Die,” “Ultraviolence” and most recently the critically-acclaimed “Norman Fucking Rockwell!”, released a statement on Instagram Thursday lashing out at critics of her music.

Lana specifically referenced “the female writers and alt singers” that bash her for “glamorizing abuse” in her statement.

She received much praise from her fans and other celebrities for her post; however, she also earned a lot of well-deserved criticism.

Lana Del Rey isn’t the first person to express distaste with their critics. Nor have these critics been very nice to Lana. Back in September 2019…

jiana nicole.

Student, journalist, and aspiring author. I love magazines.

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